Wearing wool vacation socks

Back in 2011 I dyed this yarn:

It’s a skein of Trekking sock yarn and I used it to mop up all the left over dyes on a dye-workshop-weekend we were having on one of the Dutch Wadden isles. The skein was well wrung out prior to mopping and the dryness caused the small flecks of colour.

Recently I was granted a Karma wish and I wished for Anneke to use this skein and knit socks for me:

I love them! They fit so fine and the colour knitted up great, with all the little splashes of colour.
Anneke is someone who knits as tight as I do and that’s a big pre in socks since it enhances wearability and shape. And they hug my feet, which I prefer.

I love wearing them and since I didn’t have to knit a stitch myself I know of no mistakes or coulda-woulda-shoulda-doubts of these socks. Carefree wearing!

Very happy wearing too, these colours lift my spirits. The yarn always did, from the moment it came out of the dyepot, and now I have these friendly happy socks. I’m glad to finally use the yarn that has been waiting in my stash for so long, always to be passed over because some other yarn caught my fancy or because I couldn’t knit for a while.

All those years ago, at the same dyeing workshop, I dyed another sock yarn and tried to play with the colours. This one was wound into segments here at the cabin, before travelling to the isle, so that I would get some sort of broad stripes:

In 2012 I knitted these purple socks from it, back when the blog was barely a month old:
document_upload30534-2_medium2
Ah, it’s the Prickly Pear Socks pattern by Thayer Preece Parker, with a mock cable that I like so much.

Back then I was very principally against using superwash yarn because it’s such a nasty chemical proces to burn off the scales of each fibre so it won’t felt in the washing machine. Lots of waste. The same goes for the production of bamboo yarns and seacell yarns. Awful polluting stuff.
So these socks are made with Schoppenwolle non-superwash yarn.

And of course earlier this year someone put them in the washing machine on 40 degrees and they felted into unrecognizable prickly pear jam tubes.
So I got my scissors and made the legs of the socks into wristwarmers:

Here, in the cabin, I enjoy practical knits with rustic looks and frankly I don’t care how I look as long as I’m warm, comfortable and covered in colours that make me happy.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s