Finished: Mod Madness socks

One sock blocked, one sock unblocked:

What a difference:

Once I get the confirmation email that these were knitted to the specifications (which they are) then I will do some modding of my own. The cuff of the first sock is too tight. I’ll hack it off and reknit it, bottom up.

Both toes are too roomy and the way the decreases sit at the side, amidst three stitches (twice) of stranded knitting, isn’t too nice. I’ll unravel them and redo them in a different stranded pattern, with less than 6 stitches between the decreases.

Overall I feel very good about them. They are stylish, functional Winter socks and I’m not afraid anymore of making socks with an overal stranded pattern. Cast on 72 stitches, knit them on 2,25 needles, choose between round plied yarns or fuzzy and any pattern is mine now!

The first sock weighs 45 grams, the second weighs 47. (probably the looser cuff and never touching the 2 mm needle on the second sock.)

Finished: cowl in Autumn colours

200 grams of Lang Yarns Mille Colori
on needle 4,5 mm

a self made pattern, based on this scarf that I saw in the yarn shop in Lüneburg, Germany:

I ended up inserting 5 rows of stockinette stitch in between each part of K 4, P 4 and this resulted in lovely waves bulging up from the base:

It’s a cowl for my dear neighbour, I hope she likes it.

It was a nice knit. The acrylic gives a lovely sheen and colour. I used up all 200 grams of the skein and have 16 x 4 stitches in a row. It gives nice colour stripes but the tube is just a bit too short to wear comfortably around the neck. I assume it will stretch.

Weird Wool Wednesday: “What are you doing!?”

This was bellowed out by my husband on Sunday, just as I was about to learn to do my first afterthought heel ever. “What are you doing?!
He scared me!
(In Dutch we say: “I frightened myself a little hat!”. This mental image is my gift to you today.)

From the corner of his eye he saw me taking some scissors to knitwear and he shouted out in disbelief.

It’s just an afterthought heel, dear.

My first afterthought heel ever was an adventure:

An adventure made bigger because the ball of yarn was still being used for the leg. I had the luminescence idea of turning the balls inside out in order to work from the other end of the yarn:


Easy peasy.
I did get quite a tangle but soon the yarns will be cut and the ends kitchenered in.


Now just turn the balls the right side out again.
Hm. 50% succes rate:

Still well enough to knit with and not long after this heel I finished the Dropping Madness Socks!

Now I needed to take the official pictures. One from the top, one from the side, one with the measuring tape beside it:






My turn to bellow: “What are you doing?!”

These loved ones I live with…. I may think they spend their days sleeping and snoozing but they do keep tabs on my knitting!

The socks are very comfortable. The afterthought heel makes the gradient in the stripes progress nicely AND is designed to have a striped heel. That’s some good designing right there:

Now if you’ll excuse me? I have a feeling my hairy room mate is in for a little play time.

Finished: Sock Madnes Qualification Sock

With only a few hours until the deadline:

We have to present the sock in a certain way, so the moderators of the competition can see you did enough rows and did the heel gusset a certain way and that the foot is at least 8″ long:

I wore them and find them very warm. But they also twist around the foot. They may be better suited as bed socks. We’ll see 🙂

I’ve send an email to the moderators with the link to my project page. They had a look and approved my socks. They replied and now I will be placed on a team. In a few days the teams are formed and we’ll each have a thread in the SockMadness group on Ravelry.
Soon after that the new pattern will “drop” and the first round of competition will begin.

For now I relax. I’m knitting on my grey Pumpkin Ale cardigan. Tomorrow there’s the Knit & Knot fair in Tilburg.
There may be some yarn there that wants to come live with me in the baskets in the IKEA TV-thingamajig.

Weird Wool Wednesday: changing direction

So I thought my Podcaster cowl looked a bit busy in fingering yarn, knit sideways:

So I bound off with an i-cord of three stitches and now I have an unblocked neckwarmer:

A neckwarmer that I’ve been wearing for two days now:

It’s so soft!

A neckwarmer that used up 40 grams of that Zitron Feinheit yarn. I would love to own more of it! Perhaps I do need to own more of it? Because now I have 60 grams of this ball left and I already have a neckwarmer so what’s there left to knit with it? A Hat? Would that be enough?

I think I need more of it. And a thicker version too, to knit that Podcaster sideways. I like this pattern, with its raised bumps. It’s a slow pattern though, in fingering weight. But that problem was solved the moment I changed directions.

 

Finished: Cool Wool Serra Cardigan

Finally, a handknit cardigan to suit my natural grace:
handknit cardigan
I’m so bad at having my picture taken… I keep talking while posing.
Turns out I’m not a very gracious talker. (What word requires me to stick out my tongue??)

Anyway. Cardi done! 450 grams of sportsweight Lana Grossa Cool Wool, knitted on 2,75 mm needles (3 for the sleeves). 14420 meters. The blocking evened out the stitches nicely. I wonder how the collar will keep, it’s meant to roll a bit.

I’m glad with it. It was a fast knit, six weeks from start to finish! Not much thinking required, just follow the pattern. Ish.
handknit cardigan

When I knitted the collar I decreased in the neck and at the corners with the shoulders, so it would sit a bit more snug in the back of my neck:

At the upper half of the collar I did some shortrows so I have a bit more collar around my neck than I have at the midfronts:

The pattern starts with the shoulders and then stitches are picked up to knit the cardigan top down. The ends and beginnings of that picking up is not very beautiful:

Oh. Shh! Neighbours are watching. Better act as if I belong here. Fake your status woman! There, that’s better:
handknit cardigan

Alright, that lasted all of two seconds:
handknit cardigan
Can’t fool the neighbours I guess. We lost their respect anyway, the moment we painted that door red.

Cardigan-wise I’m not entirely happy with the back. It could have had more shaping and thusly flattering the small of my back:
handknit cardigan
Critiques the woman on felted flipflops and hacked off socks for leg warmers with a chopped up pullover for a cowl,  standing outside of her outrageously red front door in an otherwise respectable street.

Yeah. A more flattering back shaping would have certainly brought more glamour to my life.

 

Wolop Adventshawl pictures and charts

chart 1: https://www.stitchfiddle.com/c/sj4l72-8ly3pm/quickview
chart 2: https://www.stitchfiddle.com/c/sj4itg-6t4lyt/quickview

All charts made in free online tool StitchFiddle. A friendly site for intuitive chart making for knitting and crochet and cross-stitch. Both colour charts and symbol charts. You can also upload a picture and it’s automatically converted to a chart for stranded knitting. I played with that a year ago, for the Elementary My Dear Swap:

Screen Shot 2015-11-10 at 16.50.52

This year was all about patterns in small strips with the colour I was given that day of the Wolop Advent Box. Here’s my shawl this morning, after a month of wearing:

I’m not that relaxed when posing for pictures:

Then Robert says: “Smile for the cat!” and things get better:

I’m wearing my Peabody pullover in Soft Donegal, a 100% Merino in a ply with nubbs. I don’t wear it often. I knitted the pullover in 2013/2014 and knitted it too short, I’m always pulling it down. The yarn pills a lot (I’m a loose knitter and it’s merino) and the pattern is not high enough in the back of my neck causing me a chill.

Really, I should chuck this sweater out, it takes up too much space for the one time a year I wear it. But it was soooo much effort to knit it. Two years it took. With many brainfogged struggles.

But I think I’ll wear it another day today. It looks great with the Advent Shawl.

finished: Wolop Advent Shawl!

It’s blocking and drying:

Here are some of the final motives:

Cats with Paw Peerie by Sandra Jäger and also hedgehogs from her. I didn’t have enough brown/mauve for the final row but they still look like hedgehogs to me.

My golden embroidery scissors.

The purple shirts I never sew.

A ribbon of flowing water; hedgehogs; mushrooms; something that may or may not be square eggs or daisies in the only multicolour I put in the shawl.

Cat paw prints; “Advent 2016”; new stars to replace the ones from December first and December nineteenth ; some geometric design in which I ran out of dark purple and finally: some fish (using different shades of the pastel greys. The purple one, the blue one and the lilac I dyed myself. Ran out of that one at the final fish and inserted some white.)

Kitchener stitched everything together, with the fish right underneath the polar bears:

The geometric design is a prelude to next year’s project. I want to do another one of these Adventsboxes!

Next time I’d love an overall design flowing through the whole cowl, with only the colours changing, following the wisdom of Fair Isle knitting when it comes to colours, colour families and contrast.

For the pattern I’m leaning towards Art Nouveau. Leaves. Curls. Smoke rings. A pattern which I’ll probably design myself, using StitchFiddle, the free online charting tool.

Advent shawl 2016 was made entirely on Stitchfiddle. It took two charts of 200 rows high each. I’ll clean them up and share them publicly. In a post with pictures of me wearing the cowl. Right now it’s still wet.

xmas day: an 11 hour shawl and Lilleroco (Lalylala)

It’s xmas day. We spend the day watching movies, cuddling the cats and knitting. I finished a shawlette I started only yesterday:

This shawl I knit in exactly 11 hours. It’s
25 cm wide and 190 cm long and made from my own handspun: the Passe-partout Merino Silk mix I spun during Tour de Fleece last Summer.
 I took out some of the darker parts as I wanted a light coloured yarn. It’s soft enough to wear around the neck. That’s Merino Silk for you. I need soft things (yarn and fibre) to wear around my neck. I’ve been wearing my Nurmilintu all the time but by now the yarn (Merino with nylon nepps) is starting to irritate my skin.

Merino Silk would be ideal. I like the look of stockinette stitch and this pattern uses its tendency to roll.

The pattern is Pip by Mona Schmidt and it states that blocking is not necessary as it favourites a rustic look. I prefer a neater look, the handspun provides character enough already, so I will block it once I’m at the cabin again. (the centrifuge is there)

In the mean time I’m wearing it and I really like it! I think I’ll knit more like these. It’s a great mindless knit and a good use of luxury handspun.

Now have a look at the xmas surprise that arrived:
Lalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskatLalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskatLalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskatLalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskatLalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskatLalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskat
Lalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskat

It’s Lilleroco!

A pattern by Lalylala: Roco the racoon. Crocheted by my very talented neighbour in Scheepjes Stonewashed yarn. In Lillepoes colours of my design.

A great finished object! It’s about the one doll that I find not creepy and the way my friend executed it is amazing. So much handmade love and skill!
Lalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskat

This was the rest of our day: Beef Wellington and Rene Russo in Lethal Weapon 3:
xmas 2016 beef wellington René Russo Lethal Weapon 3
We also saw Lethal Weapon 1 and 2 partly. The scenery and hair and women roles were hilarious. Lethal Weapon 3 has always been my favourite but nowaday the charm of Martin Riggs has worn off.

Still very fun to watch. And to say the lines before they come. Delores Hall is iconic!
 “Oooh sugar!”

Lalylala roco birman cat crochet gehaakt raskat