A better armhole and nice things on the walls.

This is the new armhole:

Much better!

It may still look a bit large but in my experience it shapes up when you pick up stitches (3 for every 4 rows) and start the sleeve. Tubes always feel more narrow.

I kept the increases at the neckline the same because I will attach a shawl collar to it. It feels a bit weird, having fronts that do not close and a neckline that even runs over the apex of the bust. But my Grey Pumpkin Ale has the same neckline and wears very nicely with its shawl collar. (And this yarn is soft enough to wear next to the skin.)

Oooh, what’s that behind me, in the hallway? Is that an embroidered cat?

It is!
cabin cosy decoration cat window sill cat embroidery
This is a vintage embroidery I found at the thrift store many years ago. Somebody put lots of love and effort in this! It came with the frame too.
I often stand before it and have a little pause, appreciating it.

It hangs over my birthday calendar, right between the front door and the hooks where we keep our keys. Under it hangs a small ceramic cat hanger, bought at the x-mas market in Muenster. There used to be some glass x-mas baubles there too, all year round. A happy little hippo and a cat, but they broke in the course of time.

The first few years we had the cabin I’d go to the church thrift store in the village here. This was before thrifting gained a main interest. It was just old farmers bringing their stuff and trying to raise some money for (the roof of) the church. It was an empty building with local ladies volunteering and a table with a coffeepot and a tin with cookies for people to have a sit and chat.

I’d look for old handmades with a friendly vibe to put on the wall of the cabin. My foot treadle sewing machine is from there too. And my kitchen scales. Most of the crockery. Some hand tools.

In later years having friendly decorations became more important as I had fallen ill by then and was staying at the cabin permanently. I’d lie on the couch most of the day, not able to move or think, and it was vital to have friendly things in sight, wherever my gaze fell. This is the wall opposite my couch:
cabin cosy decoration cat window sill cat embroidery
The embroidered cats came from the thrift store, the rest are gifts from Ravelers (=people from Ravelry). All from people who understood I had to be approached softly but not tepidly. Most of them I hadn’t met in real life when they send me things. There are hummingbirds under the lamp 🙂

Over the years family and ravelers send cards and handmades and I stuck them on my walls and they encouraged me when I felt down:
cabin cosy decoration cat window sill cat embroidery
The birdy paperclips were a birthday present.

Above my sewing machine these two hang:
cabin cosy decoration cat window sill cat embroidery
That pincushion is a handmade taking hours of love, also a present from a Raveler 🙂 Someone I’ve met maybe twice in the past 8 years! Talked to her online four times total. You don’t need to be an active presence in my life to contribute significantly to my wellbeing 🙂

The wren I painted myself, sometime in the last century. The frame is all oak, from the church thrift store.

And this is the window sill next to my sewing machine, right over the chair Lillepoes loves to sleep on. It’s also opposite my couch so I’ve seen these cards every day all day long for the last 8 years 🙂
cabin cosy decoration cat window sill cat embroidery
Cards from Ravelers, handmade pincushions, cats and fairytales. These are the four subjects my happiness revolved around for all the time I’ve been ill 🙂 I’d simply enjoy the colours and the sentiments if I was very brainfogged. I’d explore compositions and alternative storylines if I had two braincells to rub together.

I no longer live at the cabin. I’m a city girl now.
Times have changed here too. The thrift store has moved into a real store and is now a professional venue. They still have coffee but it’s a machine now: drink up while you shop.
The old farmers have all gone and their (grand)children have sold all their stuff online, cashing in on “vintage”.

We visit the cabin for short stays now. A weekend here, a midweek there. I slide right back into the old habits of friendliness and peace. But it is not sustaining me anymore if I stay here for longer periods. If I stay here longer than 5 days by myself, I get antsy and sad. I feel society’s progress closing in. There’s always more traffic, more people, more stuff being build around here. Time is running through my fingers.

It’s still a safe haven but it’s edges are defined now.
I wonder where the next decade will see us. Me and the cabin.

By the way, I recognize this antsy-ness, the feeling of being restrained. It’s the sign of one door closing and not yet seeing which window opened. It’s the sign of new opportunities. Ones you can forge yourself, should you desire to.

It’s an uneasiness I know from points in my careers, studies, relationships, internet groups, society as a whole, you name it. So I’m not unsettled by the uneasiness itself. After all, it’s the breeding ground that brings forth the most innovative things.

It’s the possibility to determine and forge a new direction that hinders me. It feels like an obligation. Be smart. Act.

But I’m not ready to bring the cabin to a new era. I’m still very much attached to old ways, old nature and old embroidered cats on the walls.

Or other beasts:
cabin kitchen wall decoration embroidery bird gaai
(that’s the wall above my stove:)
cabin kitchen wall decoration embroidery bird gaai

Advertisements

Once, twice, Little Flower Cardigan

It’s happening again…

Is it a knitting law?
That whenever you knit a fitted garment you actually knit it twice. Knit once, wisen up, rip it out, knit it again, better.

This is my Little Flower Cardigan. The one from my handdyed sportsweight, where I start with a lace backpanel and then improvise a cardigan, inspired by Dahlia Cardigan. Two weeks ago I blocked the back panel in the cabin:

And then I spend all the time I didn’t knit on the green handspun rolls vest calculating and knitting the two front panels to the back panel. I had to figure out the rate of increases and the armhole and where to pick up the parked stitches from the back panel.

I used Grande Plage cardigan  by Claudia Geiger as my guideline since we share gauge and it has sleeves you knit after you knit the bodice:

And now I have two front panels and am at the bottom of the back panel and should start some waist decreases soon (or a bust dart) and I haven’t knit at it for a few days mainly because of distraction by thrummed earmufflers but also a bit because I was unsure about it:

These front panels are a bit skimpy. I reasoned: “I’m going to add a shawl collar, just like with Grey Pumpkin Ale. It’s going to be beautiful!”

But it’s not the front that’s the problem. It’s the sides. That armhole is very big.
“It’s allright. Your Grey Pumpkin Ale has big armholes too!”

So I showed my friends the picture and asked: “Are these arm holes too big? What would you do? Would you reknit the front panels?”
And they said: “Yes, they are too big. Reknit.”

😡 I don’t want to go back to where I was two weeks ago. I want to wear this cardi, now.
So I said: “My Grey Pumpkin Ale has big armholes like this! I’ll just pick up stitches and start decreasing in the round before I knit the actual sleeve. Here, like this:”

And they said: “They are too big on your Grey Pumpkin Ale too. Look at all the fabric at the underarm.”

😡
Stupid hobby. Stupid knitting laws. I’m bound by this gorgeous yarn. I want that nice cardigan, with a nice fit. So I will reknit. After I recalculate everything.

In the mean time I’ve cast on for a loose fitting sweater. With a bouclĂ© yoke. With sparkles. Without a pattern:

And I’ve bought fingering weight for another cardigan. With speckles. And stripes. (I don’t like stripes.)

And I’m ignoring the three vests and four cardigans I already have on the needles. They are in the closet.

I feel there are some more knitting laws in play here and that I’m not using any of them to my advantage.

Weird Wool Wednesday: a frog with a silver lining.

I thought I got away with nothing weird in my knitting this week. But tonight I must admit that the shaping on this back looks really awful:

It’s like I’m hiding three little frogs under there!

These are reeeeeally long rows, top down, seamless. In fingering weight.

Front looks alright. The yarn is nice and soft against my neck.

It’s my New Old Town cardigan in my handdyed yarn. I’ve been knitting on it for days now, enhancing the pattern with some back shaping to suit the small of my back. That’s where the owl marker was used! But I guess I’ve started too late and have decreased too much in too few rows. It sags horribly.

It’ll have to be frogged to just a few centimeters below that copper centre back marker. Where I still have breasts to cover on the front, which is why I postponed all decreases until I had knit past them. I now think I will insert some gradual back decreases high up but no side seam decreases yet…

Hmpf! I was enjoying the mindless rows of stockinette stitch because we’re dealing with tropical heat in this little frog of a country and I’m also writing new reports for the courts and we have painters in and around the house.
My days are packed and stressful, I need my mindless knitting at night!

Well, the half full kind of person would say I now get to do even more of that soothing mindless knitting …
He looks so not impressedpic by Colin Campbell

Finished: grey Pumpkin Ale cardigan

It’s finished but it’s not: the pockets need to be cut out and sewn in. But the knitting is done!

Pattern Pumpkin Ale by Ysolda Teague

Cabled back panel from free pattern 123-9 Lady Love by DROPS design

The yarn is Chester Wool Superwash merino 300m/100gr and I used 4,35 balls. That’s about 1300 meters.
It’s wonderfully soft and very suited to wear against my skin. Like the collar in my neck.
I look forward to finding out how well it wears. I expect pilling with this softness.

Knit on needles 2,25 mm getting a gauge of a-smidge-under-20-stitches-in-10-centimetres. Except on the sleeves where I knitted with a gauge of 26 stitches per 10 centimetres. That is why I write in bold on all my project notes: knit sleeves on bigger needles!
If only I learned to read and follow instructions…

The back panel is so beautiful!

No time to think.

My Pumpkin Ale Cardigan is coming along fast. Back panel done, sidepanels done, one sleeve on its way:

Only I’m not sure about the sleeve set in. I’ve reduced it a lot at the underarm. And I don’t think it suits the pattern… my decreases do not look nice.

I’ve got to have a good think about it and then make up my mind.

But I don’t want to think. I want to knit!

So I started another cardigan. Here’s the little flower for the Little Flower Cardigan:

Now I must think about how to make this into a rectangle and then into a nice back panel.

This thinking thing again? Ugh. I’d rather cast on another cardigan:


Old Town Cardigan and I’m already shaping the shoulder!
There’s half a back panel here and half a collar but the pattern is so ingenious that I don’t know which is which and the picture being upside down is fitting.

Just following the pattern, no thinking required. Which is good because my mind is mulling over colour combinations and stranded knitting:

Wolop dyed four skeins to go with the four big purple balls of DK yarn. That will make a great stranded top! A cardigan.
All it needs is a little bit of thinking and deciding.

Haven’t got time for thinking. Gotta bake cookies.

Tomorrow a few cat loving knitters come to visit:
cat cookies
Ginger orange pepper cookies 🙂

Finished: Cool Wool Serra Cardigan

Finally, a handknit cardigan to suit my natural grace:
handknit cardigan
I’m so bad at having my picture taken… I keep talking while posing.
Turns out I’m not a very gracious talker. (What word requires me to stick out my tongue??)

Anyway. Cardi done! 450 grams of sportsweight Lana Grossa Cool Wool, knitted on 2,75 mm needles (3 for the sleeves). 14420 meters. The blocking evened out the stitches nicely. I wonder how the collar will keep, it’s meant to roll a bit.

I’m glad with it. It was a fast knit, six weeks from start to finish! Not much thinking required, just follow the pattern. Ish.
handknit cardigan

When I knitted the collar I decreased in the neck and at the corners with the shoulders, so it would sit a bit more snug in the back of my neck:

At the upper half of the collar I did some shortrows so I have a bit more collar around my neck than I have at the midfronts:

The pattern starts with the shoulders and then stitches are picked up to knit the cardigan top down. The ends and beginnings of that picking up is not very beautiful:

Oh. Shh! Neighbours are watching. Better act as if I belong here. Fake your status woman! There, that’s better:
handknit cardigan

Alright, that lasted all of two seconds:
handknit cardigan
Can’t fool the neighbours I guess. We lost their respect anyway, the moment we painted that door red.

Cardigan-wise I’m not entirely happy with the back. It could have had more shaping and thusly flattering the small of my back:
handknit cardigan
Critiques the woman on felted flipflops and hacked off socks for leg warmers with a chopped up pullover for a cowl,  standing outside of her outrageously red front door in an otherwise respectable street.

Yeah. A more flattering back shaping would have certainly brought more glamour to my life.

 

Strong urge to knit a cardigan

Every Saturday evening when I’m at the cabin and mentally preparing for travelling to the city the next day, I have the strong urge to start a new cardigan. I don’t know why.

I do know I already have 4 cardigans on the needles….in various degrees of finishing. All I need to do is get them out of the wool cabinet in my living room in the city and start knitting on them again. But I don’t.

Instead I bring a bucket full of white wool for a bodice and my green bouclé handspun for a yoke to the city. Or all the Norwegian yarn I had. All the Irish yarn too.

Each Sunday I’ve brought yarn for a cardigan to the city. Haven’t casted on though. Yet, today, I’ve gathered up all the dark handspun. I even spend hours deciding upon a pattern…

This is 134-17 Mist by DROPS design:

Large needles, fast knit. Koffieboontjes! The vintage Dutch lock rib, my favourite.

But upon inspection this pattern is knitted bottom up and seamless, which means you need to have gauge spot on. Also: I never figured out how to incorporate sleeves when going bottom up, and closing for the shoulders.

I’m rewriting this top down. Also I prefer the look and shape of Colors of Kauai: set in sleeves. So basically I’m rewriting Colors of Kauai for needles 10 mm.
With the DROPS pattern look and its koffieboontjes, because I do like the look of it (apart from the decreases at the top). Top down also means I can make it as long as I want to. I want a work horse for winter wearing.

I’ve tried to knit with this yarn before. I did nearly a whole Wrenna cardigan but I really don’t like the lace stitches in this bulky yarn. Mine is not as beautiful as the pattern picture:

pattern Wrenna by Kristeen Griffin-Grimes:

 

 

 

 

 

There’s also Iceland by Stephanie White:

Which I once made into a more fitted cardigan called Sidewind:

The special thing is that the leaves run sideways on the sleeves in accordance to the front/back panel even though it’s not knitted as part of those panels. Here you can see it all started with a rectangle that I wrapped around myself, then I added a part consisting of a sleeve, a top yoke (shirt sewing terminology, not a knitted yoke) and the second sleeve:

I started the sleeve with a gusset and half a sleeve. Then I worked to the wrist cuff, turned and somehow added the back part of the sleeve, having the leaves run the other way.

I’d love to reknit this sweater. Solve that problem of flowing leaves without knitting half sleeves sideways. But better not with the bulky dark yarn. That just doesn’t look good in YO stitches.

Well what do you know, another Saturday evening gone and I didn’t knit a stitch.

I did remember that there’s this pattern in my bundle called Love to Make it One Day:


It’sConcrete by Nicole Feller-Johnson
Easy to make, gauge not important. Start a square until wide enough to think about arm sleeves. Think about a warm neck instead: make it a bit higher, perhaps add a few decreases so the collar won’t gape.

Reminds me a bit of Drops’ Eskimo Shrug that I knit into a Franken-eskimo-vest before and which has inspired me before to knit that other cardigan that started with a panel on the upper back:

Those weird things happening at the armpit… knitted lines towards the apex of my bust.
With the weird buttonholes not matching up with the front panels.

I only wear this one when at the cabin. But not because of the weird things. Because I’ve gone off this colour completely. Turquoise, mint, bluegreen, teal. Don’t want it.
It feels like orange to me. Bluegreen is the new orange and I don’t want it.

Time to wrap this up. My Saturday evening is spend, cats and husband are milling around the room, hinting they want to go upstairs.

So: skip rewriting Colors of Kauai in a ridiculous large gauge. Start a back panel in the round, like Concrete. Get to the front. Remember to make it high in the neck at the back. Add some sleeves. Make it a good length. Add buttonbands and let them have koffiboontje mock rib like the DROPS pattern up top.
Need to make up a name for it.

Oh! I haven’t even told you about the yarn. It’s an oldie but a goofie 😉
400 grams, 700 meters. Short stapled organic fleece, akin to Zwartbles. All spun in one weekend back in January 2010 when I was fairly new to Ravelry and spinning and participated in a spin-along.

I spun it semi long-draw ON A LOUET S10 and Lillepoes was very interested:

Sewing for knitting:

Over the Summer I’ve been sewing my new wardrobe. I had major plans: skirts, blouses, vests, pinafores. All in that colour palette and all flattering my body shape.

This is what I managed from May 1st until now:
Sewing skirts, learning to.Sewing skirts, learning to.

Skirts. Well, one skirt, actually. This is the progress towards developing one pattern that fits me well and has all the features I want (pockets!) and that I know how to make (sturdy seams, pockets, waist band, lining, hem, zipper, zipper seam allowance catching the lining).

I’ve got it down now. I can sew a skirt in a week, I feel.

So last week I finished a skirt in a fabric to compliment the Wollmeise Fliederbusch of my Colors of Kauai cardigan:

sewed a skirt, wet felted a bag

The idea was to make a bellowing skirt to flatter my Colors of Kauai cardigan, just like these, both from the very inspirational Jettshin:

But I didn’t have enough fabric. And a bellowing skirt doesn’t fit my body shape very well (lack of a waist). But now I do have this pattern that flatters me. So I cut the fabric on the bias and followed my own pattern:

sewed a skirt, wet felted a bag

Oops, cut it a bit too narrow! Never mind, I’ll just put in a strip of fabric, even if it has to be cut on the grain. Might as well since I’m not sure how well flimsy fabric on the bias can support a pocket so I’ll go ahead and put a little patch pocket onto that strip. There, all done.

Time to fit!
Ah. Uhm.

It seems that without a distinctive flare it doesn’t really work, this sewing with this knitting:

Nice lady, no doubt. But not quite the flair or femininity that Jettshin project photos show.

I don’t know why I thought this skirt would work. I talked myself away from the very goal I was aiming for!

“Yes, I’ll sew a bellowing skirt because that fits Colors of Kauai so well! But I’ll make it without the flare because arguments. Hey, I’ll even cut it on the bias for even more drape and droop!”

Yeah…

Well, the skirt works great on its own. It’s light and lined with pure silk and it flutters around my legs. It’s a nice Summer skirt for the city.

Wearing it without wooden clogs also helps to class it up.

Now I’ve got an incentive to sew another skirt to got with this cardigan. Which means fabric hunting.

But first I’ll try and sew a fitting blouse/dress shirt. I need those to go with the many vests I’m knitting. With any luck I’ll be wearing the combinations before x-mas.

(bag felting went well this weekend! I only want to switch the flaps between the two bags and then visit the shoe maker to get belts attached. So still very much in progress.)

sewed a skirt, wet felted a bag

WIPs: have I stranded?

Last week I told you I could not proceed with either of my stranded mittens because I had run out of white yarn for one pair and for the other I also had a good excuse although it escapes me at the moment.

Well last Friday my husband traveled from the city to the cabin and brought all the supplies I needed. Meanwhile I was visiting Wolhobby and her wonderful cat Beer (“bear”) and came home drunken with knitterly achievement. Holle cardi was finished! And I had found courage enough to proceed on Blue Texel Shetland Wrap!

All systems go for last week, you’d think. Yarn for the two mittens, ideas for the wrap and there was that nice ice pastel handspun I spun that wanted to become something stripey.

Well, this is where we are one week later:
– mittens: not touched.
– wrap: wrestled into submission but it took a while. Now it’s sewn up and I can proceed on the border.
– handspun: given away. (??!)
– unexpectedly cast on for a top down cardigan:

and already well past separating the sleeves! Eep?

The pattern is Entangled Vines by Alana Dakos:

An uncomplicated top down cardi with raglan sleeves and an added button band in garter stitch. With a lovely leafy detail on the shoulder and sleeve.

I’m knitting a size 41″ in Mondial Shetland Mohair which is a discontinued yarn which consists of

40% falkland wool
35% british wool
15% kid mohair
10% viscose

To me it’s a yarn with memories. It was given to me as a price in a wonderful Knit-A-Long in a Dutch knitting group a couple of years ago, by Aafke7 who has a stunning talent for seeing and creating beauty in daily moments:

Beauty is an ecstasy; it is as simple as hunger. There is really nothing to be said about it. It is like the perfume of a rose: you can smell it and that is all.
W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)

As soon as I received the yarn, back in 2012, I cast on for an intricate cardigan called Kelmscot, a design by Carol Sunday. It has various charts and lace and bobbles. It was a lovely winter knit in the winter of 2012 and the Dutch crafters cheered me on and taught me how to seam seams and whatnot:


projectpage here

I was so proud. So happy. But when it was finished I found I preferred the Mondial to have a different colour. It originally was a warm grey with specks of neon yellow and neon pink in it and I’d rather have it purple.

So I overdyed it:

No small feat! To get an even dye distribution you need to stir the project in the water but you’ve got to be careful not to felt it. I’d done it! I’d put it through the spin-dryer and was looking at it and realized I wanted it to have it a teeny bit more saturated tint and also a bit less splotchy. Seeing the dyepot was still warm I chucked in some extra dye and dunked the cardigan into the water and started reheating it slowly and stirring. And then everything went wrong.

The terrible felting acceident of the 31st of January 2013 happened.

I miscalculated how tiresome it is for me to stand on my feet for longer than 20 minutes. How much work handling a wet garment is. I missed how tired the first dye session had made me. To be honest: I was exhausted but too tired to notice. Besides, I was drunk with succes that it had gone so well. I stood on my feet for another hour and a half and ruined the cardigan.

I cried. Then went to bed. The following week, month, year I couldn’t bring myself to throw away the now gorgeous coloured piece of intricate felt and I still plan to use it in a felting project someday.

In the meanwhile I still had half of the Mondial yarn left, enough for another cardigan. The past 3 years I’ve thought about knitting a second Kelmscott. But the memorie still hurts, I don’t think I should knit that pattern ever again.

What I did do a couple of months ago was prepare to overdye the yarn. I do love grey at the moment but with the flecks of neon in this one…. The specks are what makes the yarn a warm grey instead of a cool or neutral grey. Warm grey doesn’t suit me very well. Neon specks don’t suit me at all. They are only seeable close up though. But seeing as I wear my eyes close up to my clothes…

A couple of weeks ago I overdyed it with green and steel blue and a bit of black. It’s now a dark greenbluegreymuddyteal:

You can still see a speck of neon yellow. I pick them out.

Friday I came home from Wolhobby with my Holle cardi and Saturday I cast on, using some of the glass bead stitchmarkers from Helix77 that are little “hello, warm greetings!” every time I use them 🙂
That’s the value of handmades, they are personal messages! Anything that’s thoughtfully given to you, actually. A daily caress or pet on the head:

Oh, I lie! I didn’t cast on on Saturday. I spend that whole day looking at a project for the handspun in optimistic ice pastel colours.

No that’s not true either! I was resting on Saturday from the travelling the day before and I spend the whole day looking at beads and figuring out which ones to order and from whom. Yes that’s it, last Saturday I spend 8 hours at the computer looking at sparklies. In the evening I emptied my Paypal account in one of the shops and that was my day. And I felt mighty good about it too!

 pic Chrystal and Ice beadshop in the UK

I’ve got plans to knit another Temptress shawl, with big triangle beads. Which have gone out of production with Japanese bead producer Miyuki since I knitted my first Temptress it seems.

Sunday I browsed patterns for the self striping handspun and around midday I realized I wanted to knit a bias striped top very much but not with the handspun.

Instead I preferred that the handspun would go to a special person and surround her with cheer and a daily pet on the head. I offered it to her and she gladly accepted. In return she has offered to try and knit me a neckwarmer -leafs!- in this nice yarn.


Pattern: Children of the Forest by Kamilla

Yarn: Malabrigo yarn lace, a single in Merino.

Both gifts. The thing with gifts is that I love to use them immediately so you can savour the moment.
This yarn you’ve got to approach this yarn with a bit of sense though. It’s not well equipped for a lace work since it’s a single and Merino, two characteristics that make it want to curl up on itself and hold on to its own feet. The comments on the yarn page regularly speak of projects felting and pilling and shawls needing reblocking after even one wear.

So I thought: better keep the yarn double, for strength. And because I do not enjoy knitting with lace weight because it takes so long. Unless it’s lace stitches with big sparkly beads. Then I thought: lace stitches are not smart but textured stitches will ok. Then I looked at the meterage I had, having the yarn double. And I looked at the items I knit and wear the most: neckwarmers and polswarmers. I nearly started a pair of mittens with it, stranded mittens, white with green owls.

But this yarn is buttery soft and therefor a delight to wear around the neck. Don’t go and waste it on hands where they will get dirty and where you don’t need buttery softness!
Can’t knit the twisted stitches though… staying in the cabin has made my shoulder flare up. But I do want to use the Malabrigo as soon as possible! Shall I weave it then? no… not with it being a single…
My friend offering to knit this is so well timed and so much appreciated!

Having promised her the handspun and having looked at many tops and at my queue and favourites many times I then cast on for Tangled Cardigan.

This cardigan will become a staple cardigan in a good, neutral colour that still looks lively due to colour variations and even though it won’t steal the limelight from any shawl or jewelry I wear with it it has a sympathetic leaf detail on the sleeve. I’ve wanted to knit this cardigan for a few years now, ever since the pattern was given to me to another lovely knitter whom I share a love for nature with. She’s the one who gave me the Indigo seeds! She’s so in tune with nature that when she drags her fingers through some soil plants just pop into existence. And kittens, she tends to attract kittens too.

The cardi is knit out of yarn that reminds me of the wonderful KAL back in 2012 when the Dutch segment of Ravelry was a different place (not that I’m sorry that it’s different today, a place like Ravelry always evolves and new flavours of solidarity emerge, flavours we couldn’t phantom a few years back. That being said, 2011 and 2012 were special years for the Dutch community and I like to reminiscent while knitting with this yarn.)

And the yarn makes me think fondly of the lovely Aafke7 who ran that KAL and is such a lovely person.

It knits up at a good gauge and steady gauge which means I can just follow the pattern and not loose myself in sidetracks and difficult puzzles I set myself. That being said, I did change the second and third leaf on the sleeve so it would be a bit more round and not look so “collapsed” as it does on the project photo.

BUT WHAT ABOUT THE STRANDED MITTENS?

Well, yesterday evening I’ve started to look at the mittens again. This morning I adjusted the pattern for Snow mittens and now I’m ready to knit on them again. Just in time because in about one hour my husband returns to the cabin again from the city and it would look odd that I insisted he bring me my yarns last week -he had to delve into the wool closet and I had to email him instructions –with pictures!– as to what it was I was looking for- and then I didn’t use them until he returned here this week.

Finished: buttons on Holle Cardi

As part of a swap I went and visited Wolhobby today to help me with some WIPs that I keep putting off. She put the buttons on my Holle Cardi!

The buttons look really smart with the Wollmeise DK in colourway Fliederbusch. It’s so wonderful, my cardi is finished!
Now I want to sew a bellowing skirt to go with it. WIPs beget WIPs.

Wolhobby showed me a quilt technique for fast knots to start. And we explored seaming techniques for my Blue Texel/Shetland throw/wrap. She alerted me to the site VeryPink.com, which shows techniques very clearly and with technical finesse. I love technical finesse.

This weekend I’ll finish the last of the knitting on it and then I’ll start seaming.

We spend a lovely few hours crafting and we had cat help from Beer (meaning “bear” in Dutch):
cat help with knitting

and Apollo:
cat help with knitting
who has the loudest purr and an adorable white point on his tail.

Both are such cuddly cats! Beer allows you to touch his feet, his belly, his tail. My cats have strict rules about this, mostly being “NO.”. So I took the opportunity and petted Beer everywhere.
cat help with knitting

Apollo prefers petting of the head:
cat help with knitting

Beer approves of my Visjö hat:
cat help with knitting
cat help with knitting

A lovely day.