Weird Wool Wednesday: overdyeing a vest

Overdyeing those socks made me feel good! I’m good at dyeing! I’m the bestest!

So let me just go ahead and overdye that handspun vest!
From rust orange to dark steel blue:

😦
It’s really difficult to dye an existing fabric consistently.

Those dark spots are not shadows, they are stains of darker dye.

(don’t know what to do with it yet. Overdye with an aggressive commercial dye? The vest cannot be put through the washer like is custom for those dye jobs.)

overdyeing socks

As part of a swap I offered to overdye some knee socks that had uneven colouring from a previous dye attempt.

As usual my keenness to solve a problem made me overlook all the practical obstacles. And there were some!

  1. these socks are already knitted. It’s very difficult to dye knitwear evenly. You need a big pan and lots of water and careful pacing of dye and acid to avoid spots or felting. My previous attempt failed horribly.
  2. it has previous stains. These will always show up in any overdye job. Luckily they are dye stains and not grease or anything. Still. It would be best to dye very dark and visually drain out the stain.
  3. this yarn is part acrylic. Acrylic doesn’t take acid dye. I will not be able to dye dark.
  4. these are not my socks. If I ruin these socks it’ll be terrible. Extra stress.

Luckily the knitter is a knitter and very lovely. She assured me again and again that whatever I do it will be ok. She’s open to surprises.

So I pulled out my dye pot and Ashford dyes and set about.

First: thoroughly wet the knitwear. I put it in water the day before. Squeezed out all the air. Kneaded it repeatedly. Every fibre needs to be wet.

This is how the socks look on the day of the dyeing:

overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye

The now thoroughly wetted socks display uneven colouring in a dramatic fashion, it’s not as bad as this in real life. But bad enough for the owner not to want to wear them. Which is a shame.

Second: make the dye bath. The owner had requested a half-blue colour as her favourite so that’s what I start with.

I take precautions so I can dye the fabric slowely, making adjustments along the way. For this I make the dye bath without the acid and I use lukewarm water, not hot.

I put the wet socks in the dye bath and manipulate them. I swirl them so the dye touches every part of the socks. I then stretch the knitted fabric, in all directions. I stop just short of pulling the socks inside out.
overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye

Stretching the fabric to make sure the dye reaches the inner part of the stitches:

I check and recheck the colour and the evenness. Pretty soon I put the wet socks aside and adjust the dye bath to a more intense colour:
overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye
Put sock back in. Swirl, knead, stretch stitches. Still no acid and no heat.

On the third bath I add a bit of red because the red stain will keep showing up. The rest of the sock will need a bit of red too. This time I keep the stained part of the sock out. It’s the rest of the sock that needs darkening. Dipping only part of the sock, keeping the stain out of the pot:
overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye

When I like the overal colouring I add vinegar. Pretty soon the colour drains completely from the bath. I’m pleased that the acrylic doesn’t pose a problem, it seems to be well blended into the yarn. I could probably go some shades darker too. But I don’t like the risk of heathered colouring or felting.

Now I put it on heat to fixate.
The pre-existing stain is still there. I’m hoping it will be less prominent once the sock is dry. Do that first, fixate and dry, and then assess. I can always give it another go.
overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye
This is right as I put the heat on. See how exhausted the dye bath is already?

Results:
overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye

The socks are nearly dry. They are not very blue, more of a jeansy blue.

The stain is still visible but acceptable:
overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye

Detail on the other side: dye right into the middle of the stitches:
overdyeing handknitted socks acid dye

but not through and through. I think this is as much as the acrylic content will allow. I hope the owner is happy with them and they get to see more wear.

 

Shibori dyeing as a birthday gift :)

shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats
For my birthday, Lieneke from Wolop offered to come make me an indigo dye vat. I’ve never dyed with indigo before! (I tried, once.)

Today she traversed the width of our country, from the far West to the furthest East, as a mobile one woman indigo dye show. She brought everything with her on the train: a dye pot, all the chemicals, scales, gloves, the indigo. I have a little stove for outdoor dyeing and there are sticks in the woods here for lifting the cloth out of the pot. And off we went!

We dyed on the veranda of the cabin. It rained most of the day. The smell was terrible! But holy moly, what magic! Lieneke knows what she’s doing and I’m in awe: indigo is a diva! The temperature needs to be juuuust right. The pot cannot have chips and cannot be iron. The indigo cannot be old. You cannot stir, you cannot swish. You have to move slow. But have to replace the lid fast. You can’t let your cloth drip in the bath. You have to show the fresh dyed cloth a lot of fresh air, fast. A million little things need to be done just right…

….and then you get the absolute right thing:
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats
The results are spectacular!!! Colour by Lieneke, patterns by me.

I had never done shibori before, where you manipulate the fabric before you dye it. You fold it, you scrunch it, you tie it with string. There are many words for the different techniques. I surfed the web and found I have a preference for long, stripey patterns. So folding, pleating, stitching and clamping were the techniques I tried when I prepared the cloth in the last week.

Here are the pieces I prepared. Folding, pressing, twisting, tying, all in different sequence.
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats
At the bottom is the last bit of stitching still in progress this afternoon: wood grain shibori/ mokume shibori.

Tightening the wood grain shibori:
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats

Rrrrrrrresult!
wood grain shibori mokume indigo dyeing
Mokume shibori.

I had purchased 4 meters of bleached linen. Washed it twice at 90 degrees (as hot as the washing machine goes). I cut it in pieces of 50 x 70 cm because that’s a good size for clothing pieces such as a skirt panel or the left front panel of a top. I plan to sew with it. Garments. Little project bags. Left overs in a quilt. (a what now?! sshh. Let’s pretend I didn’t write that.) I’ve kept one piece behind, still white, it will combine nicely.

This is the result of the carefully pleated, ironed cloth with all the little multi coloured clasps:
itajimi shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats
Itajimi shibori.

This is the result of the neatly pleated folds that were wound around a little piece of wood (a bamboo crochet hook). I had put a little bit of cling wrap around and tightened it with elastic band. This kept the main parts white and only the edges of the pleats received dye:
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop
Suji shibori.

What is this magic of indigo anyway? It’s pale green in the pot and then you bring it out and it starts to breathe, in blue:
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleatsshibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats Amazing. And smelly.
How and why you need to charm indigo before it will act as a dye is nicely explained on the vlog of Dünkelgrun which is hosted by Anna who has an PhD in chemistry.

By the way, I’m a bit of a travelling one woman show myself. I arrived early at the train station this morning and got a bit more stitching done. Just started the “wood grain” stitch: Mokume shibori
shibori indigo dyeing Wolop pleats

As a first entry into the world of Shibori I found this tutorial from the smart women of Beyond Canvas superb: Beyond Canvas on shibori  

So both pleating and stitching shibori give results I love best. Randomness within a grid.

Stitching is called Nui. Stitching next to a fold is called Orinui:
orinui shibori indigo dyeing Wolop

Itajimi is folding and clamping. I used some pieces of cardbord as a resist and just tied it with thin string, I didn’t have clamps that could grip it. Here you see how the top part printed, with the shape of the carton and the string:
itajimi shibori indigo dyeing Wolop

Suji is pleating. And wood grain is mokume shibori.

There’s one other technique that I love but lacked the tools for today: pole wrapping. This is called Ashari Shibori.

I’m putting all the jargon in here so I can refer back to it next year, when I dye with indigo again. Because I surely will! This was such fun and the results are so beautiful! (I will have sewn this into garments before next year yeah? Yes. Definitely.) And then I’ll dye again. But not on my own. I prefer the guidance of an expert.

This is a wonderful birthday gift. With some highly original wrapping and a very sympathetic entertainer! 🙂

ecoprinted shirt (murdering flowers)

I’ve stamped flowers unto my mordanted shirt:
ecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nlecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nlecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nl
“Pull it straight.” my husband said:
ecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nl
I promise I’ve been wearing an extra shirt underneath since then…

Rosepetals and Robertskruid:

ecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nl

Printed in the evening, when the leafs and petals are not so moist anymore. Better to print in the morning. The front side was printed in the morning and has better prints (except for the fern which was another evening stamp):

ecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nl
This is the rose in my back yarn that the petals came from, a true red, stamping purper:
ecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nlecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nl
Pelargonium flower and some weed that grows between the tiles:
ecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nlecoprinting flowers on mordanted t-shirt. Bloemen stempelen op t-shirt, geleerd bij wolop.nl

After wearing for only a couple of hours: additional ecoprinting with a messily eaten strawberry.
Untitled

Curse this alum drenched shirt!

Dyeing swifter fleece with nettles (not)(nottles)

At the cabin this weekend I gathered a bunch of nettles and put them in a bucket with warm water to soak overnight. Woke up to a black tarry substance. Ew.

Added hot water and brought it to a boil, for about an hour:

In the same time I mordanted 300 grams of white, washed Swifter in warm water with alum. Then I did some more research on the net and read about someone who got nice green by using 6 times the weight of the wool in nettles. So I won’t use all the wool for this pot of nettles. I took about half.

I strained the liquid and used it to dye about 150 grams of prewashed fleece. Heated it for hours. But it wouldn’t take the colour:

At the end of the day I have greyish fleece…
. That’s what I was aiming for, that was what I was hoping to spin. I have no idea what went wrong. Perhaps the nettles I took were too mature? Or had grown too much in the shadow? Should I have added more alum?

I took the remainder of the white fleece and cooked it up with the leftover dye bath of the red onion skins:

Nice yellow 🙂 Not a trace of the green that dyed the sock yarn in the same dye bath. What a riddle this plant dyeing is!

We then had to leave nature behind and go back to the city, boohoo.
Here I have to prepare for an abdominal CT scan on Tuesday so today I can’t eat anything and I have to drink a litre of sweetened barium gooey and overall I’m feeling pretty sorry for myself. (but not as sorry as when this had been a colonoscopy, with a camera up the bum!)

To pick myself up I made some more photo’s of the onion dyed skein. The colour is beautiful and intense. And so hard to grasp! Even on these photo’s it looks a bit washed out but in reality it is not, not for one bit 🙂

Solar Dyeing by myself

Today it’s 30 degrees in the sun, a good prompt to do some solar dyeing.

I chose some duizendblad (= Cow’s Parsley) to see whether I could overdye some two toned blue Merino I’ve got. Mordanted with alum:

21-06-10 Cause I'd Rather Pretend I'll Still Be There At The End ~ Explored #1 pic by Bethan Phillips

This is the Merino I started with, a whole box full. It’s so soft! Two tones of blues, very similar to the Shetland I’m spinning at the moment.

The new and the old colour next to each other:

The darker blue only got a tinge of yellow. The light one is beautiful, really bright. But it’s all too bluegreen. I don’t enjoy spinning, knitting nor wearing greenblue at the moment. A good experiment. Now I know I won’t be overdyeing the Merino with Cow’s Parsley.

Here’s the experiment in a better colour photo:

When I tried to open the jar an hour ago it wouldn’t budge. I grew so frustrated that I decided to prick a whole in the lid. And I noticed I couldn’t open the other jar either….

It’s the red onion solar dyeing project I got at Wolop’s plant dyeing workshop a month ago! Might as well prick that one too. And since it then opened so easily I better take out the skein and look how it went, my first solar dyeing experiment.

Ooh! and Aaah!

It’s so hard to capture the colour! It’s golden green, through and through and it seems to come from the core of the yarn, not laying on the outer surface. It’s gorgeous.

I saved the dyebath and hope to cook it up later today and dye some fleece with it.

Workshop Ecodyeing techniques at Wolop!

Yesterday I had a wonderful workshop at Wolop: three techniques of ecodyeing. I went home with a skein in a jaar, with numerous printed fabrics and with a printed shawl still in a bundle.

Outside the studio the plants are growing, this is “Stinking Goldy” (Stinkende Gouwe in Dutch and Greater Celandine or tetterwort, nipplewort or swallowwort in English), a plant which doesn’t stink in particular but has bright yellow sap that will stain your clothes (but not your wool). Gouda, the name of the city, has two canals called Gouwe 🙂
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
It gives beautiful prints when hammered:
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
These are some hammered prints I made, from violets:
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
I tried hammering plants before but I didn’t know what I was doing. Now I do. I’d love to do this more. Embellish shirts and skirts or use fabric for WIPbags. Anja Schik had some beautiful examples in her studio when she presented her book about Eco Dyes. Her example showed how the colours faded in time:

Lieneke was very liberating in her remark that you can always hammer a new flower on. And pre-mordanting makes a difference. As does fixating the print. All things she taught us.

The second technique we learned was about printing. These are some printing examples from Wolop:
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeingworkshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing

After explanation and examples we got to work ourselves. Lieneke had a multitude of various plants to chose from. The one in front is mine:
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing

Our “bundles” in the make:
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
Eco-printing is all about bundles.

Lieneke showed us how various you can make use of bundles. How about taking little pieces of cloth with you on a hiking trip and taking some leafs and earth from a friendly space and making a bundle right then and there? Or what about making some on holiday?
India Flint, queen of eco-printing, even brings a small cooker with her on holiday, to steam the bundles in her holiday homes. But Lieneke says: why not bring your bundle home in a ziplock and cure it there?
So many possibilities! A lovely experience to have the world open up like this.
This is the bundle that I took home:
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
and I’m supposed to leave it alone for a few days. Weeks if I can muster. I’m not that patient! This looks so promising.

Thirdly here is some solar dyeing in progress. The ball on top is dyed with red onion skins:
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
All natural plant materials: onion skin, madder, dandelion flowers, more onion skins and woad.
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
The dandelion is my favourite. It’s an experiment but it seems to be going well. And the yarn has sparkles!
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing
We made a vessel of our own. Lieneke taught us how you can determine whether a plant shows promise for dyeing. It was a really good workshop!

Just when we thought we were done we got a fourth, extra technique. It was a special bundle that we have to bury in the garden and leave there for months. Months!

It was a really good workshop. I recommend it. There will be a second one in June, in Gouda, in the second studio Lieneke uses. June 17th, 45 euros all in.

workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing

You may skip this last bit, it’s about my health:
I was meant to do this workshop last year but something went wrong on the trainride to Gouda. The train broke down and we stranded in the middle of the country on a very hot day (May 28 2016). I dehydrated while trying to make it to Gouda in time, by bus. Dehydration is a danger when dealing with adrenal problems. A danger I’m prone to, I learned that day. Luckily my parents live near one of the busstops and I avoided an adrenal crisis by ringing their doorbell, heaving and shaking and crying uncontrollable, unable to speak.

Luckily my mother is not easily spooked, she put me on a day bed and brought me salted tea. Later on my husband came by car to get me and take me home. No workshop for me and it has stung for many months. Stupid health. Stupid trains!!

But now I’ve done the workshop and it was wonderful! I learned so many things! And grew so confident by seeing the examples and seeing how Lieneke does things and approaches eco dyeing.

I did get reminders that my health is not optimum. I had trouble concentrating and needed to eat Wolop’s chocolate chip cookies all the time. It is weird, not being in full control of your mind. It got a bit better when I took more and more of Hydrocortisone (which scares me because it depletes the bones of Calcium).

Still. It’s not easy not being well. It is weird, first and foremost. I suspect it gets weirder with age.

It forces me to often take stock of all the things I want to do and then choose the most important to do firstly. Because there’s not enough vitality and time to do all the things. (The stock taking itself takes energy too so got to keep that in mind too. And then there’s the need to stop doing the fun thing halfway through because there’s vitality and time needed to clean up too.)

Man. Living ain’t easy. And it’s weird. But the workshop was lovely!
workshop Ecoprinting Wolop Gouda wol ecodyeing

“Just add a little green….”

I wanted to dye a skein of soft fingering yarn cornflower blue.

Because I’ve won the Make-A-Wish-Swap in the Dutch Karma Swap Group again and my wish was for someone to knit me a blue shawlette 🙂 because my eyes looks smashing when I wear blue next to my face but I myself don’t like to knit with blue (???).

Easy plan, easy dye. I went to the cabin yesterday, one day before my husband, and pulled the pots and pans from the wool room. Lillepoes was giving directions.

And I ended up with green instead of blue:

It won’t photograph properly. It’s a deeply saturated dark green with blue semi solid. It was a green variegated yarn to begin with and when adding blue it became VERY BLUEGREEN. The kind I don’t like at all.

Then, while trying to make it a proper green instead of a teal, I mixed too much green dye and then had to find extra things to dye green.

By then it was already getting really late. The cat kept nagging me, demanding food and attention and bed routine. But I knew I had to finish it all before bed (rinsing and spinning it all dry and putting it on the drying rack in the middle of the room) and clean everything up too because things had to be tidy for this morning or my husband and Poekie wouldn’t fit in the room.
dyeing wool
dyeing wooldyeing wool
Oh man, why do I do this to myself? Again and again? (I must secretly love it, that’s the only explanation for it. Alright, alright, the only sane explanation for it.)

Dyeing on the evening of a busy day in which I drove all the way to the cabin, by myself, with Lillepoes loudly giving directions for the full 75 minutes it takes me to drive there and with all the mad people on the road, clearly all letting their blind cats hold the wheel.

Sigh. Stuck with a cup full of extra strong green dye I found myself digging through the stashroom, late at night, frantically looking for more stuff to dye.

Here I am chucking dry fleece and dry silk into the pot with the dark skein from the first pictures:
dyeing wool
The fleece is Swifter that I had dyed too “Autumny” and too blue-green back in the Autumn. It’s such great fleece! Great staple, nice touch, nice smell. When I rooted through the stash-room I had real difficulty not to dismiss all plans I have for the next few days and start carding it right away. Lovely fleece!
This:

became that:

Now card it in with the rest of the white and I’ll spin for a lovely jumper!

Make haste! make haste! I cannot wait to spin this! No. Wait. Noooo. We are knitting the Sock Madness sock while we are at the cabin. We are also casting on for a new vest if we need to do something on bigger needles. And we have the Music Maker sock with us for easy knitting. We have an all day birthday visit on Saturday and an all morning spinning group on Tuesday and we will be travelling back on Wednesday and there were a thousand things you wanted to paint while here. Also shower. So: no. No carding.

The silk skein I threw in is the lovely mulberry silk fingering yarn. But I kept it in short because I want my silk to be lightly coloured. Like willow wisps:

Yes, succes!

Silk soaks up colour like nobody’s business, I could actually use it as “a mop” to drain the dye from the water and dye the fleece evenly and not too dark. I was lucky though, the water had not had vinegar yet which makes dye soak into silk even faster. Too fast would have been a problem here because silk needs to be presoaked for quite a while to become thoroughly saturated. Only thoroughly saturated yarn will take up dye evenly.

Otherwise it will stay on the surface and only in the places that are wet. Which is a desirable effect on its own when dyeing speckles or for a sprayed look. But not for me, this night.

I was also lucky in not overdoing it and dye the silk too intense. It’s hard to gauge a shade when the yarn is wet and when you’re dyeing in the evening. The lamp over my dyepot is a daylight lamp but still… better to dye during the daytime.

I then started the pot again. This time dyeing with just Ashford blue, on an undyed base. But I had no sheep yarn left. I did have more silk though…. not sure my well-wisher wants to knit with it. Silk is slippery, especially this mulberry silk (my favourite!). But the colour is s*m*a*s*h*i*n*g*l*y blue:

I would LOVE to wear this colour near my face.

Again I had to take care to not leave the silk in too long. It is a bit more intense than I wanted. I remember thinking: “O yes, this is just right! Or maybe a little too light?…. I’ll just leave it in the water, the water is nearly clear anyway.”

And then the silk went and soaked every bit of dye it could find and became two or three shades darker than I had wanted. Still beautiful.

For a while I had the silk parked outside the pot and threw in two bits of sparkly sock  yarn to “mop up” the extra dye in the water. When they had done so (but apparently not to the maximum extend) I put the silk back in and heated everything to dyeing temperature and added vinegar

It’s happily blue glitter yarn now 🙂
The light one used to be light green, the dark one was a multicolour. They now go well together. Perhaps for a crocheted hat?

Aw, the sparkle doesn’t show one bit in the picture. It’s very pronounced in real life though and will look great in crocheted fabric. I have 25 grams of the dark, 45 grams of the light. Enough for a pair of knitted socks for me. Enough for a crocheted hat?

workshop Dyeing with Mushrooms, Day two results.

we did the greys, blues and reds and the light yellow in the lower left. I opted out of the beige that comes from the abundant native mushroom Aardappelbovist (Scleroderma citrinum)

Lots of drab, smurrie and sludge again:

Sorry, very tired. Two night with 5 hours of sleep total. Talk staccato, mkay?

Sitting now with colours all around me. Thinking stranded projects, shapes, combinations.
Knitsonik is very much on my mind.

Also this book: Poetry in Stitches. Old. 1997. Wish I had it. Very much so. De Schapekop had one in Norwegian, I was delighted 🙂 Looking for one like this for me: Dikt i masker.

Rukt i Masker Poetry in Stitches boek Solveig
Solveig takes heartfelt landscapes, historic textiles and cultural identities and translates them into stranded patterns.

Rukt i Masker Poetry in Stitches boek SolveigRukt i Masker Poetry in Stitches boek Solveig

Want too. This way of designing. Dutch things.

Thinking about these:

Puttertje by Carel Fabritius uit 1654:

Dutch tiles. Art nouveau. Snowdrops. (these are lilies, couldn’t find snowdrops. Don’t like lilies):

Winter almost gonepic by Atze Dijkstra

There are tiles on many buildings in my city and other cities I hold dear. There are also typical Dutch tiles in my house, behind the fire place. Won’t do blue and white though.

Would love to do a “pimpelmees” but don’t have the right blues. Another time, little friend:

Dutch traditional clothes. Colourful. Practical.
from Marken:
marken vrouw pic by Gwen the Monster
from Volendam (wouldn’t do Volendam though, it’s too iconical):
2011 Markenpic by Jose Gonzalvo Vivas
from Friesland:
pic by Theun
Nice colours.

For now I’m thinking light coloured vest with snowdrops, wrens and the checkered pattern of the “Kievitsbloem”. All early spring, end of winter symbols. Art Nouveau shapes. First time steeking.

Another project to use the warm yellows, the ochres, with the steel blue I bought to go with it. Perhaps wristwarmers, not a vest.

Another with the colours of the painting Puttertje. Those are the ones we dyed yesterday: the red, the blues, the greys both warm and cool. They don’t flatter the colours of my face but they are beautiful.

I wouldn’t depict the bird itself. I would only use its colours. Or it’s essential shape or combinations. It’s face mask for example. The streak on its wings. I found another painting, using the same colours as the Puttertje:

It’s not Dutch though, it’s French: Fleur de lande by Jacques Wely. “Flower of the land.” But I think it’s a Dutch girl. It’s from the Art Nouveau era.

I want one vest finished half way May, when there’s a Knitting and Crochet festival in the old town nearby De Schapekop and the mushroom instructor will be there again.

But first: rest rest rest. Got nice things to watch on the inside of my eyelids though. Knitwear designer things. 🙂