Once, twice, Little Flower Cardigan

It’s happening again…

Is it a knitting law?
That whenever you knit a fitted garment you actually knit it twice. Knit once, wisen up, rip it out, knit it again, better.

This is my Little Flower Cardigan. The one from my handdyed sportsweight, where I start with a lace backpanel and then improvise a cardigan, inspired by Dahlia Cardigan. Two weeks ago I blocked the back panel in the cabin:

And then I spend all the time I didn’t knit on the green handspun rolls vest calculating and knitting the two front panels to the back panel. I had to figure out the rate of increases and the armhole and where to pick up the parked stitches from the back panel.

I used Grande Plage cardigan  by Claudia Geiger as my guideline since we share gauge and it has sleeves you knit after you knit the bodice:

And now I have two front panels and am at the bottom of the back panel and should start some waist decreases soon (or a bust dart) and I haven’t knit at it for a few days mainly because of distraction by thrummed earmufflers but also a bit because I was unsure about it:

These front panels are a bit skimpy. I reasoned: “I’m going to add a shawl collar, just like with Grey Pumpkin Ale. It’s going to be beautiful!”

But it’s not the front that’s the problem. It’s the sides. That armhole is very big.
“It’s allright. Your Grey Pumpkin Ale has big armholes too!”

So I showed my friends the picture and asked: “Are these arm holes too big? What would you do? Would you reknit the front panels?”
And they said: “Yes, they are too big. Reknit.”

😡 I don’t want to go back to where I was two weeks ago. I want to wear this cardi, now.
So I said: “My Grey Pumpkin Ale has big armholes like this! I’ll just pick up stitches and start decreasing in the round before I knit the actual sleeve. Here, like this:”

And they said: “They are too big on your Grey Pumpkin Ale too. Look at all the fabric at the underarm.”

😡
Stupid hobby. Stupid knitting laws. I’m bound by this gorgeous yarn. I want that nice cardigan, with a nice fit. So I will reknit. After I recalculate everything.

In the mean time I’ve cast on for a loose fitting sweater. With a bouclé yoke. With sparkles. Without a pattern:

And I’ve bought fingering weight for another cardigan. With speckles. And stripes. (I don’t like stripes.)

And I’m ignoring the three vests and four cardigans I already have on the needles. They are in the closet.

I feel there are some more knitting laws in play here and that I’m not using any of them to my advantage.

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Finished: grey Pumpkin Ale cardigan

It’s finished but it’s not: the pockets need to be cut out and sewn in. But the knitting is done!

Pattern Pumpkin Ale by Ysolda Teague

Cabled back panel from free pattern 123-9 Lady Love by DROPS design

The yarn is Chester Wool Superwash merino 300m/100gr and I used 4,35 balls. That’s about 1300 meters.
It’s wonderfully soft and very suited to wear against my skin. Like the collar in my neck.
I look forward to finding out how well it wears. I expect pilling with this softness.

Knit on needles 2,25 mm getting a gauge of a-smidge-under-20-stitches-in-10-centimetres. Except on the sleeves where I knitted with a gauge of 26 stitches per 10 centimetres. That is why I write in bold on all my project notes: knit sleeves on bigger needles!
If only I learned to read and follow instructions…

The back panel is so beautiful!

Dyed yarn for two cardi’s.

This kilo of sportsweight:

is now 5 skeins of steel blue:

and five skeins of happy Spring lilacs:

Wollmeise Mauseschwanzchen for comparison.

With the steelblue I want to reknit this cardigan:

Me, three years ago. Knitted in ordinary sock yarn that now has started to pill.

The pattern is Old Town cardigan by Carol Sunday. It has an interesting construction:

The pink purply one will become an adaption of Dahlia Cardigan by Heather Zoppetti:

I do not own this pattern and I want a different shaped cardigan but love the atmosphere of this cardi. This is the pattern I’ll be using for my backpanel, The Little Flower Doily by Andrea Jurgrau:

A free pattern that I’ve used it before, in this hat in 2010:

I’ll need to figure out how to get to a rectangle or an oblong shape from this round starlike flower.