Happily knitting a blue sock.

You know I don’t like to knit with blue yarn.
But I make an exception for the hand dyed indigo yarn from Wolop. This is great to knit with!

I’ve already finished one sock.

The pattern is a pattern with leaves that I’ve used for plant dyed yarns from Wolop before and I LOVE those socks. They remain beautiful and wear so well.

Woad and Red onion:

The pattern used to be Blattwerk by Stephanie van der Linden but there’s an error in the charts and I’ve changed the mock cable and the heel and other things. Also this time I’m knitting it top down.

The back:

The toe:

(I still cannot kitchener toes without them getting pointy edges. Don’t know the solution. Do you? I tried pulling the yarn through the last three stitches but that didn’t work.)

This is where I am now, about to turn the heel on the second sock:

There’s an extra incentive to knit with blue: this yarn is wound into a Magic Ball!

As I knit little presents fall out:

As part of a swap Lieneke filled it with little gifts that are are freed when I knit up the yarn. This was freed already:

ūüôā

Now that makes me knit with blue yarn!

This is still waiting for me:

Poke poke to get a peek peek:

Hmm. Suspicious shape… I know this shape…

Could this be…. a snow man?…. as a cookie cutter?

What do you think, Lillepoes?

Ponder….

Yes, definitely a cookie cutter. Knit on and make me some salmon flavoured cookies!

Knit on, human!

Solar Dyeing by myself

Today it’s 30 degrees in the sun, a good prompt to do some solar dyeing.

I chose some duizendblad (= Cow’s Parsley) to see whether I could overdye some two toned blue Merino I’ve got. Mordanted with alum:

21-06-10 Cause I'd Rather Pretend I'll Still Be There At The End ~ Explored #1 pic by Bethan Phillips

This is the Merino I started with, a whole box full. It’s so soft! Two tones of blues, very similar to the Shetland I’m spinning at the moment.

The new and the old colour next to each other:

The darker blue only got a tinge of yellow. The light one is beautiful, really bright. But it’s all too bluegreen. I don’t enjoy spinning, knitting nor wearing greenblue at the moment. A good experiment. Now I know I won’t be overdyeing the Merino with Cow’s Parsley.

Here’s the experiment in a better colour photo:

When I tried to open the jar an hour ago it wouldn’t budge. I grew so frustrated that I decided to prick a whole in the lid. And I noticed I couldn’t open the other jar either….

It’s the red onion solar dyeing project I got at Wolop’s plant dyeing workshop a month ago! Might as well prick that one too. And since it then opened so easily I better take out the skein and look how it went, my first solar dyeing experiment.

Ooh! and Aaah!

It’s so hard to capture the colour! It’s golden green, through and through and it seems to come from the core of the yarn, not laying on the outer surface. It’s gorgeous.

I saved the dyebath and hope to cook it up later today and dye some fleece with it.

Socks in Progress

I’ve spend the last two days in bed¬†and had plenty of time to knit on the socks:

One sock is finished and the other is nearing the cuff detail.

The first sock had a figure 8 cast on of 2 times 14. Increasings were made every third round, +4 per incr. round. This made the toe too pointy for me:

For the second sock I did a cast on of 2 times 18 and increased 4 stitches every other round until I reached 2 times 31 stitches:

Perfect.

My sock doesn’t fit

I finished the first plant dyed Blattwerk sock:

I adjusted the pattern to accomodate my high instep. I topped the leafs with a double decrease. And changed all the twisted stitches into regular ones to please my shoulder impingement. I did twist them on the cuff though, to make it different from the leg:

And then:

it didn’t fit.

The leg is too tight for my heel to pass.

I don’t understand. I had the yellow socks with me all the time, studying them¬†and copying that.
Why won’t the leg fit?

It’s because I knitted it over 60 stitches. Like I do all my legs of all my socks.

I know this leg is patterned and this usually affects the stitch number. But I assumed that the faux rib would be a bit stretchy just like the faux rib called “koffieboontje” is but it isn’t. It actually doesn’t stretch at all. On top of that I thought the combination of knits and purls would give more give so I wasn’t worried at all. Just focusing on getting the leafs beautiful and carefully knitting all those twisted stitches in the cuff.

Mind you, the pattern does specify to knit the leg over 70 st. But because I had made modifications and knew the pattern by heart and had my example socks I didn’t reread the pattern.

As usual I fitted my sock many times during the knitting, right to the top of the heel flap. From then it was a home stretch, I thought. I have skinny ankles, I can get away with a leg and cuff of 54 st. 60 will be good.

Well, it isn’t.¬†I’m ripping¬†everything out and wil restart¬†from the top of the heel flap and use 70 stitches. This yarn and these socks are too beautiful not to be made into a pair of fitting socks.

The colour, when I knit with it it’s a true grey but from the corner of your eye it’s a purple grey. And under artificial light it’s purple grey for sure, as all the photo’s show.

Plant dyed yarn is a marvel.

UPDATE:

Knitting on the sock right now. We drove to the cabin earlier today, me and Lillepoes.

One of us was protesting all the way here:

And now she refuses to come outside even though she absolutely loves it here.

She’s beaming and meowing to me through the glass door:

Cats are weird. I better go in and pet her.

500th project: mauve socks with leaves.

This morning I cast on with the plant dyed sock yarn I purchased from Wolop last Wednesday. The pattern is my take on Blattwerk by Stephanie van der Linden.

I’ve given the base of the leafs a slip-over-stitch so it has a distinctive beginning. And I’m finishing the tops with a double decrease, for the same visual clarity.

The leafs won’t be sharing stitches and I do a cable crossing to avoid decreasing a stitch that I later need as a purl framing for the textured stitches.

I’m keeping a gusset for longer than the pattern states and also won’t be decreasing it right after I turn the heel. That’s way too tight for my highish instep.

The toe was finished on the card drive to the cabin and now we’re here, amidst the green.

I have a second lettre scale. So much more sympathetic than those electric scales that are always hungry for more batteries and take long seconds to make up their mind when you switch them on: “do I want to weigh something today? Or shall I just pretend the battery died already?”

onion socks: Tears of Laughter

I got a beautifully dyed skein of sock yarn from Wolop:

It’s dyed with onion peels. From red onions. Because they give green.
(White onions dye yellow. Obviously)

They were dyed in a jar in the window sill. With water, peels and a bit of alum. Just leave it for a bit, like a few weeks, occasionally turning the jar. It’s called solar dyeing. Whodathunk? So easy!

Wolop brought one of her jars to the fair and it was a great conversation piece. Here it is, on the right:

Midwinterwol 2015

This one has regular white onion peels in it and is dyeing yellow. Obviously.

The colour of my skein is marvellous! So intens and so happy.
It’s the very reason I bought¬†sock pattern Blattwerk by Stephanie van der Linden:

I’ve casted on and am having a blast knitting it. The colour, the pattern, the memories of the fair:

This is where I am this morning:

I’m even wearing a matching longsleeve!¬†For someone who proclaims to be in a silvery grey phase I sure do enjoy my intense ochres…

PS I’ve written about it before but plant dyes may not be light fast? That’s when I’ll dunk my socks in a fresh jar and put them in the window sill for a bit.

Image a window sill filled with jars with all different colours, sun light sparkling through. Knitters are awesome home decorators.